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GENERATION "Y" MORE LIKELY TO VIEW SHOWS ON TV PROGRAM WEB SITES; ALSO GIVES GREATER CONSIDERATION TO EPISODE SPONSORS

Annual Knowledge Networks How People Use® study details connections between TV versus Internet viewing of shows

Menlo Park, Calif.; March 11, 2008: A new How People Use® (HPU) study from Knowledge Networks shows marked generational differences in approaches to TV program Web sites, with younger viewers more likely to watch complete episodes – and to give greater purchase consideration to brands that sponsor Web viewing of those shows.

Now in its second year, How People Use® TV's Web Connections provides an in-depth look at the Internet viewing habits and opinions of Generation "Y" (ages 13-28), Generation "X" (ages 29-42) and early Baby Boomers (ages 43-54), showing that:

  • Generation Y (33%) and Generation X (27%) led early Baby Boomers (19%) in use of official TV program web sites.
  • Gen Y (62%) users are much more likely to have watched a full episode on the program site than Gen X (41%) or younger Boomers (32%).

The study – which utilized a trademarked Knowledge Networks methodology for understanding how consumers integrate media into their everyday lives – also examines how these users' Internet viewing habits may influence their consideration of marketing and advertising associated with TV programs viewed on the Web:

  • All generations indicated that sponsorship of an entire episode on the program's web site would increase their consideration of the sponsoring brand (Gen Y, 60%; Gen X, 50%; early Boomers, 44%).
  • Early Boomers (42%) are more likely than Gen Y (29%) and Gen X (32%) to watch advertisements or commercials played during or before their viewing of streaming video on these sites.

"The level of satisfaction among all users of network Web assets is very positive news," said David Tice, Vice President & Group Account Director, Media Team, at Knowledge Networks/SRI and Director of The Home Technology Monitor™. "Equally encouraging is that younger persons, ages 13 to 34, are the highest proportion of users of these assets – the same Gen X and Gen Y users whom networks were concerned about losing to new digital options."

Based on a survey of 2,209 Internet users, How People Use® TV's Web Connections 2008 also quantifies

  • attitudes toward advertising in streamed and downloaded programs
  • fast-forwarding through ads
  • features and content most used on network and program web sites
  • time of day and location of use
  • types of consumer technology associated with viewing
  • local station web site use

How People Use® TV's Web Connections 2008 is part of the ongoing service The Home Technology Monitor™, the definitive source of reliable insights into consumers' ownership, use, and response to media-related technologies, from broadband to DVRs to wireless Internet access. The program builds on nearly three decades of research, combining top-quality nationwide surveys of technology ownership with special reports on key devices and services. These special reports are usually based on the How People Use® methodology.

Knowledge Networks specializes in solving complex, high-impact problems, providing extraordinary quality and service to leaders in business, government and academia. We work closely with clients to create healthy consumer-brand connections, effective marketing and advertising, sound public policies, and accurate social science research. We have established respected practices in media, marketing, advertising, and government & academic studies. KN excels in study design, analytics, and custom panel creation; we deliver affordable, statistically valid online research through KnowledgePanel® – the only available probability selected, nationally representative Internet panel.

In 2001, Knowledge Networks acquired assets and expertise from Statistical Research, one of the country's leading authorities on consumers' use and ownership of media and technology.

For more information, contact:

David Stanton
908 497-8040
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